Posts Tagged "stress"

Let’s Get Outside

Posted by on Jun 2, 2013 in Featured, Health | Comments Off on Let’s Get Outside

Let’s Get Outside

Heading into June finds us in the longest days of the year. This is it: the time to get outside and enjoy as many drops of sunlight and warm weather as possible. We wait through many months of darkness to get to here so what are you doing to make the most of it? I was inspired by the David Suzuki Foundation challenge this past May to spend 30 minutes in nature for 30 days. Sounds simple enough. However, according to the D S F website, the average Canadian spends more than 90% of their time indoors! Unless we make a deliberate and conscientious effort, it can be easy to miss the summer.  Do you find yourself saying “Where’s all the time gone?”I hear this from people quite frequently and especially so this past May. Perhaps you tell yourself that you’ll make it out to something eventually but never somehow quite seem to manage to. It’s so easy to lose track of time and let these days of light and sun slip through our fingers. Don’t let it happen! In the spirit of these beautiful long days of light leading up to the summer solstice, and inspired by the David Suzuki Foundation, I encourage you to commit to spending at least 30 minutes outdoors for 30 days in June. (Then, maybe continue it through to July, August – you get the picture.) There are many health benefits to being outdoors, including increased vitamin D which has a host of benefits (see Dr. Tara Andresen’s blog earlier this winter on the importance of Vitamin D http://www.sourcecentre.ca/vitamin-d-to-the-rescue-your-secret-weapon-during-the-cold-flu-season/ ) We experience greater peace and healing in nature; our stress levels lower, we are restored and feeling happier. We’re also more likely to experience greater fitness levels the more time we spend outdoors.  So are you ready to commit to more time outdoors this June (and beyond)?   Let’s walk, run, play, swim. The options are endless. Or why not take indoor activities and bring them outside? This could be office meetings…or eating lunch…or brushing teeth! Check out the great suggestions on the David Suzuki website and drop by and pick up a journal at Source Centre where you can track your outdoor adventures. Take on the great outdoors this summer, so that when it draws to an end and the days become perceptibly shorter, you can feel satisfied and satiated by all that you did. Enjoy this sublime season. See you outside. (photo by Lana, who got outside)  ...

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About Maintenance

Posted by on May 15, 2013 in Featured, Health | Comments Off on About Maintenance

About Maintenance

(Image: ‘Girl Doing cartwheel At Beach’ by imagerymajestic / FreeDigitalPhotos.net) Life in the western half of the world teaches us that if something’s not broken, don’t fix it. Therefore, when one is “healthy” there is no reason to go to the doctor. It’s only when one finds one’s self “unhealthy”, that it’s time to go find a cure, see a doctor, take medication(s), do whatever will “fix” the problem. This to many of us is the normal way of things. On the other hand, we’re told that we must have an anti-virus installed on the computer and always have it backed-up; we’ve got to change the filter in the furnace and regularly change the oil in the car. In these examples, we’re exhorted not to wait for something to get broken because it will cost us twice as much. Quite frankly, I don’t understand the logic! When we’re talking about our belongings we need to be proactive but not when it’s about our bodies and our health and wellbeing? Maintaining good health in our bodies is something we all can and need to do. It’s also something we ourselves can take the initiative on through the choices we make. What we put in – what and how much we eat and at what times – and what we put on our body. It’s vital to be physically active, to listen to our body’s limits, to ensure we’re getting enough sleep. These are only a few examples of how our personal actions can benefit our health. That being said, there are many therapeutic modalities out there to assist us in achieving and maintaining great health. Many of us are aware of the great benefits of Chinese Medicine in treating a wide variety of conditions, from pain relief to dealing with allergies, emotional stress, anxiety, hormonal imbalances, infertility, and much more. But did you know that, above all else, Chinese Medicine is a preventative medicine? Chinese Medicine as a whole, and especially the “Stems & Branches” method, is designed to be a preventative type of medicine, first and foremost. The ancient Chinese actually developed different techniques to prevent illness and maintain health, that differ from those used to treat a disease.  In the “NEI JING”- the main classic of Chinese Medicine – it is said that a good doctor will get rid of the symptoms and relieve the patient’s suffering. A great doctor will treat the root of the illness and prevent its recurrence. A real master, however, will identify the illness (by pulse diagnosis) before it manifests in the physical body and prevent it from occurring at all. Also consider, in this system the doctor only is paid as long as the patient stays healthy. When someone is sick or suffers from disease, the treatment is free! In our era where healthcare is so costly, think of how wonderful it would be if this was still the way we operated. So my advice to you is to take an active role in your health.  Live right. Eat right. Sleep right. Find the kind of physical activity that fits who you are and allows you to experience joy. And yes, you can use Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture to make sure you stay happy and healthy. Don’t wait for something to get broken. Trust me, it’s much cheaper and more pleasant if you don’t.   Yours In Health, Yuval Blum...

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When It Rains It Pours

Posted by on Dec 10, 2012 in Featured, Health, How-To's, Quotes & Thoughts | Comments Off on When It Rains It Pours

When It Rains It Pours

I have personally been dealing with a lot of potentially stressful challenges  lately.  Now, the reason I say “potentially” is because nothing is actually stressful until it is perceived by the nervous system as stress.  That said, I have also noticed that many of my clients and friends have been experiencing an abundance of potential stressors recently.    The expression “when it rains it pours” comes to mind in these situations.  It is interesting how this can often be the case in our lives where challenges are concerned.  They can often pile up leaving us feeling overwhelmed, helpless, anxious or drained of energy.  The cumulative effect of compounding experiences can have a significant impact on our health and wellbeing and on our ability to manage our stress  When I have a lot to deal with, I am especially grateful to be able to call upon the strategies I have learned in my body and life through my process of healing.     What I know about stress in the body is that if we want to be able to handle stress and actually process and learn from our experience of it, we need to create an environment of peace within the body.  When the body is at ease then it has the chance to be able to process stress.  If the body is in a state of overwhelm, this capacity is significantly diminished.  It is also very difficult to process things with only the mind.  When we can use the whole bodymind to process we have much more capacity.  This is why choosing actions to help us move into our bodies at times like these are especially valuable.   When I am faced with a lot of potential stress, it is vital for me to choose actions that will help me stay present and connected to myself and my body, which takes me out of thinking and worrying and into feeling and processing.  Here are some strategies I use for connecting with my body and processing potential stressors:    Increase my frequency of Network Chiropractic Entrainments Increase my frequency of Somato Respiratory Integration Exercises Doing whatever actions are necessary to deal with the practicality of my situation(s) Practice other body centered techniques I have learned (i.e. meditation, focusing, body scan, pelvic awareness, grounding) Practicing faith, trust and surrender Exercise Yoga, especially restorative yoga Journaling Spending time in nature Connecting with family and friends and sharing my situation and feelings with them Dancing Playing guitar Doing anything creative Getting good rest Eating clean and healthy food   Certainly, there can be times when I am so overwhelmed that I feel like I don’t have access to any strategies.  This is when it is the most difficult to take actions like I am suggesting above because when we are in overwhelm, or fight or flight, we do not think clearly.  However, when I choose to utilize my strategies I am more able to harness the pouring rain and use it to nourish my healing process to allow myself to...

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Tips for Optimal Recovery

Posted by on Feb 16, 2012 in Featured, Health, How-To's, Testimonials, Uncategorized | Comments Off on Tips for Optimal Recovery

Tips for Optimal Recovery

(Image: sscreations / FreeDigitalPhotos.net) Recently, I had a couple of wisdom teeth extracted. Admittedly, it was an uncomplicated procedure as far as these things go but I was amazed and delighted with the speed of my recovery. After a couple of days, I felt fully healed and experienced barely any pain throughout. As I contemplated and expressed gratitude for this good fortune, I realized there were definitely some things that helped speed along and ensure a fantastic recovery. I would like to share them here with you in the hopes that you might find them useful too. In no particular order: Daily meditation and prayer: we may hear a lot these days about the value of this practice and there is good reason for it! Given our busy lives lived within chaotic and noisy cities, it is absolutely vital to create a quiet, centering space within. The more I practice this, the quicker and easier am I able to access the calm within even the most stressful times, thereby easing any tension and anxiety.  Prayer is a relatively new addition for me and I like to end my meditations with a short wish that I may meet all that is coming my way with dignity and grace; that I am able to surrender to the things I cannot change.  That I accept and trust. In the weeks before my appointment, I also added some affirmations specifically directed towards my procedure. In the meditative state is where I employed them and they ran along the lines of: I am a terrific healer. I heal quickly and well. (Visualizations, too,  work wonders if you are a visual type.) Support: I found it invaluable to know and understand the type of support I would need in the lead up to the procedure, the duration, and the recovery period. Then I ensured that I asked for it.  For me, this meant having a knowledgeable and gentle dentist (a huge, huge thanks to Dr. Kevin Kliman and staff) whom I trusted and knew respected my anxiety issues around dental care. It also meant having a loved one come with me to my appointment, wait for me,  greet me with loving arms when it was over, and help me home (then make me mashed potatoes for dinner because it was pretty much all I could eat). It also made me feel better to talk about my impending procedure because I felt nervous about it and talking helps me. It allowed me to commiserate and receive words of support and counsel from those who had already been through such a thing. It helped me feel less alone. For all of us, support means something different but ultimately the important thing is to articulate to yourself what it is exactly that you need. Then, ask for it! If we carry unspoken expectations, we’re bound to be disappointed. Better to connect and discover what you need and then find the help. Most of us are delighted to help, but we just need to know how. Plan ahead for rest: we push ourselves very hard and often get caught in a mindset that we have to do everything ourselves. The world won’t fall apart if we plan for an extra day or two of rest, even if we think we’re feeling okay to continue on as before. I found it very helpful to know I had an extra couple of days blocked off to heal; it eased any anxiety I may have nursed about having to go back to work when I wasn’t quite ready. We can’t heal fully...

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