Posts Tagged "raw food"

Eat For Spring according to Classical Chinese Medicine

Posted by on Apr 7, 2014 in Featured, Health, How-To's | Comments Off on Eat For Spring according to Classical Chinese Medicine

Eat For Spring according to Classical Chinese Medicine

(Image: “Asparagus” by SOMMAI/ FreeDigitalPhotos.net) Spring is finally here! Even though the temperatures are still colder than we’d like, it’s clear that the spring is here. The days are longer and the sounds of birds can be heard clearly. A fundamental of every traditional medicine, including the Chinese, is that humans need to be aligned with nature and the natural environment which means adapting habits and activities according to the changes in the seasons and in nature. For every season there are recommended activities and specific nutritional requirements. Spring is the time when nature renews and rejuvenates itself emerging from the slow activities of winter. Green begins to emerge as the dominant colour. The corresponding organ in our body is the Liver. As the liver is responsible for cleaning blood and removing toxins from the system, it plays a vital function in keeping the immune system healthy and strong. Spring is also the time for us to get back to increasing our physical activity which is in sync with the role of the liver in controlling the function and flexibility of the muscles and tendons we use to move our body. Generally speaking, our spring diet should be rich with the things that resonate with the springtime energies: vegetables (especially green leafy ones), sprouts, and fresh fruits. When it comes to food groups, the following are most recommended for the season: Grains – Spelt, rye, oat and wheat. (35% of the meal) Legumes – Peas, Mung-beam. (5%-20%) Vegetables – All green leafs, green onion, leak, artichoke, asparagus, aromatic herbs such as parsley, coriander and dill and root vegetables like radish, daikon and even leak. (Vegetables ideally make up 50% of the meal with 5%-10% of the meal should containing protein, though it’s recommended not to overeat animal protein. Easier to digest and more appropriate for spring are fish, chicken, and chicken liver. If you are able to, it’s a great time to cut out all animal protein. Combining grains and legumes in the same meal provide the perfect protein.) Healthy fats such as avocado, nuts and sesame can be added to meals as well as sea vegetables such as Wakame and Spirulina. Spices – Aromatic ones: curcumin, star anise, hours-radish, fennel seeds, rosemary, and mint. Cooking methods should also be attuned to spring energies. Cooking times should be faster. Rather than the stews and soups we had during winter, we now want to do more juicing, steaming, wok cooking and sautéing. Enjoy your cooking and have a blooming and sunny...

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Year of the Snake- Year of the Spleen

Posted by on Feb 14, 2013 in Featured, Health, How-To's, Uncategorized | Comments Off on Year of the Snake- Year of the Spleen

Year of the Snake- Year of the Spleen

(Image: “Snake In Green Nature” by SweetCrisis/ FreeDigitalPhotos.net) Many Chinese communities all over the world celebrated the Chinese New Year this week and welcomed the year of the snake. A short brief: According to ancient Chinese philosophy, there are two main cycles in nature representing the order of the universe. The first is a cycle of 10 (“stem”) and the second, a cycle of 12 (“branch”). Each branch can be viewed in 3 different perspectives: 2 hours of the day (24 hours divided by 12 branches). 12 months of the year (lunar months). 12 years great cycle. Within the great 12 year cycle, every year is represented by a sign that symbolizes the characteristic of that year, much like the famous zodiac known in the west. Each branch, in addition to its correspondence to an animal, has a deep relationship with an organ in the body. It is important to keep in mind that an “organ” in Chinese Medicine is a wider term than it is in Western Medicine: there is the physical organ and physical function, and it also includes its meridian, and its emotional and spiritual functions. The “Organ” belonging to the year of the snake is the Spleen. The main role of the spleen is to control everything that has to do with digestion. On the physical level it is food and fluids but consider also the digestion of data, thoughts, and information. Why snake? The snake represents a very strong digestive system. So strong that it can digest a prey that was swallowed whole. This year, therefore, the spleen is especially active. It means that it has the potential to be in its full manifestation and strength if we take good care of it. Conversely, it means that it can be easily injured and harmed if we don’t treat it appropriately. So how can we help the spleen this year? As the master of digestion the spleen likes a variety of foods. A diverse and colourful menu, rich with many nutrients will nourish and support the spleen. The one exception are carbohydrates. It is important to monitor the quantity and quality of these to ensure the spleen is “happy” and is not harmed. The spleen is also sensitive to cold foods like dairy products, and uncooked food straight from the fridge. Raw fruits and vegetables should be eaten at room temperature. Ice creams and ice cold drinks should be eliminated!! All of these are truths in every year but more so in a snake/ spleen year. On the mental/ emotional level it is important to keep a relaxed lifestyle as much as possible. The spleen is prone to harm from overthinking and too many worries. Practicing meditation, qi-gong, yoga or any meditative activity on a regular basis will support the spleen. Even things like guilt and avoiding responsibilities can harm the spleen so this year is a great time to take action and ownership in our lives. Regular Chinese Medicine treatments, Acupuncture and herbal remedies designed to nourish the spleen are also highly recommended. Wonder how your spleen is doing? Signs for injured or deficient spleen include: • Gastrointestinal symptoms like IBS, diarrhea, constipation, nausea and stomachaches. • Food allergies and intolerance • Menstrual disorders • Tendencies to bruise easily, nosebleeds, bleeding gums • Hemorrhoids • Collapsed organ/tissues • Severe conditions like anemia and immunity and autoimmunity diseases If any of the above conditions are familiar with you and you wish to address them, please contact us by phone or email. Together we will have a great, healthy and successful year of the snake! Yuval...

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Making Friends with Salad

Posted by on Feb 4, 2013 in Featured, Health, How-To's, Recipes | Comments Off on Making Friends with Salad

Making Friends with Salad

(Image: ‘Fresh Salad’ by rakratchada torsap / FreeDigitalPhotos.net) My life’s sometimes a roller coaster with regards to maintaining good eating habits. It’s easy to get caught up in the challenges and difficulties in eating well all the time. Really though, the creative opportunities are abundant and all around! Take salad days, for instance, an easy and enjoyable way I’ve found to get my raw veggie fix for the day. The ingredients are as follows: find one (or more) participating co-worker(s) and choose the salad day of the week. On that day, each person brings in a couple of items to toss into the communal salad. Take turns assembling or do it together. The result: a delicious and always unique creation. What I have discovered in doing this: – Lunch is always huge, delicious, and cheap – The salad is always different, allowing for variety & satisfaction – It’s really easy to grab a few items to bring in the morning than to have a prepared lunch to take – I am encouraged to eat better the other days – I’m held accountable to eating well because someone else is counting on me for their lunch too – It’s a lot of fun and there is a lot of camaraderie in doing this with other people – I get new ideas for different salads – It’s contagious – other people want to join in or create their own salad day alliances How easy is it? The options are endless! I usually bring what I have in the fridge or interesting leftovers. 4 items or so apiece works nicely. Some handy ingredients, beyond the typical lettuce, mixed greens, spinach, cukes, tomatoes, could be (and have been): – Leftover roasted/grilled vegetables – Can of beans – I like chickpeas, romano, black or a combination – Goat’s or any other kind of cheese – Nuts & seeds – hemp hearts? Sunflower seeds? Tasty! – Sprouts – many possibilities here: radish, alfalfa, broccoli, mung bean, etc. – Grilled tempeh or tofu cubes – Olives – Avocado – Hard-boiled egg (or other animal protein, if you are so inclined) – Cooked quinoa or other grain The possibilities are many and a lot of fun. We’ve had some odd salad combinations here but they were all great. It’s usually easy enough to keep a bottle of lovely olive oil (unrefined, cold-pressed please) or sesame and balsamic (or apple cider) vinegar & salt & pepper. You could easily keep a bottle of ready-made salad dressing around but playing with your own concoction is much tastier. I really enjoy adding a tasty fat to my salad. Avocado and lemon juice provide a really nice combination. Or try my new favourite: tahini dressing! Mix tahini, fresh lemon juice, salt & pepper, a minced clove of garlic and a dash of sweetener (I like agave or maple syrup). Taste and adjust as to desired consistency and taste. If it’s too thick add water and adjust seasonings, if needed. This can keep well in the fridge for several days. See – you can too make friends with...

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July Challenge: Fruits & Veggies

Posted by on Jul 3, 2012 in Events, Health, Uncategorized | Comments Off on July Challenge: Fruits & Veggies

July Challenge: Fruits & Veggies

(Image: vegetables by Suat Eman / FreeDigitalPhotos.net) It isn’t exactly breaking news that fruits and veggies are good for our health. Or is it? We were recently inspired after a TEDx talk given by Dr. Terry Wahls who overcame Multiple Sclerosis with a diet that included 9 cups of fruits and vegetables per day. Amazing! She had brought an array of produce with her to the talk; the camera shot panning the beautiful colours of berries, peppers, squash and leafy greens set our mouths watering. So of course we thought, let’s all do it! And thus the July challenge was born! Thank you to all who participated. (Don’t you feel amazing?) We hope you continue to eat lots of fruits and veggies. It may sound difficult, but fear not! You don’t need to cut out anything just add! Add all sorts of fruits and veggies with every meal. Some caveats though – keep it fresh, rather than frozen or canned. And no potatoes or corn! That’s it – no deprivation, just great delicious food. Now that we’re in the hottest months of the year, what better time to really start enjoying nature’s perfect food! We’ll be announcing the winners of the July challenge soon, please stay posted. 1st prize: a complimentary initial naturopathic visit with Dr. Tara Andresen (a value of $165) 2nd prize: a complimentary nutritional assessment with Dr. Leo Quan (a value of $80) Like us on Facebook and stay posted on recipes, tips and special Fruit days!… Dr. Terry Wahls’ video that inspired us all is below:...

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Raw Zucchini Marinara Pasta

Posted by on Dec 5, 2011 in Featured, Health, Recipes | Comments Off on Raw Zucchini Marinara Pasta

Raw Zucchini Marinara Pasta

(Image: Jean Scheijen / sxc.hu) Besides being passionate about Network Spinal Analysis, I’m an avid raw foodist. I’ll save the full personal story for another post, but I’ve been raw vegan for the past 4 years and during that time was even 100% vegan for over 1 year. Before that, I had been steadily cutting out animal products from my diet. My health, my morals and the future of planet earth demanded it. Even the research literature supports a plant-based diet (again to be covered in another post). In keeping with my interest in raw and vegan nutrition, I have been conducting raw food talks at Source Centre and the response has been very positive so far! I’ve also been sharing my raw food creations at recent potlucks and have been asked to share my recipes. The sharing starts now with a simple and quick recipe for Raw Zucchini Marinara Pasta. Enjoy the flavours, the freshness and the health benefits!   Recipe: Low-Fat Raw Zucchini Marinara Pasta Serves 4  Pasta 4 medium zucchini  Marinara Sauce 100g Sundried tomatoes (not in oil), soaked overnight in water, drained and squeezed 250g Fresh tomatoes, chopped: ideally roma, campari, cherry or grape 3 tbsp Balsamic vinegar ½ medium onion 1 clove garlic Oregano or other herb of your choice  Garnish Fresh basil (if available)   Preparation Using a spiral slicer, mandolin, or vegetable peeler, make “noodles” from the zucchini. Set aside. To keep spiralized noodles manageable to eat and handle with a fork, you may find it useful to cut in half each individual noodle pile that comes out of the spiralizer. Place sundried and fresh tomatoes with all other ingredients in a blender and blend on high. Plate the noodles and top with ample amounts of marinara. Garnish with basil and enjoy!   Did you know? Both tomatoes and zucchinis are super dense with vitamins, minerals and other nutrients, and low in calories? According to http://nutritiondata.com, my go-to for detailed nutrition info, 300 grams of zucchini (a hypothetical serving size of noodles) contains: 142.5 mg omega 3 fatty acids, 5.1 g of well-balanced protein, 4.8 g fibre, 52.5 mg Vitamin C, 285 mL water, 48 calories, and more. 200 grams of fresh tomatoes can provide you with: 1666 IU Vitamin A, 25.4 g Vitamin C, 15.8 mcg Vitamin K, 474 mg Potassium, 189 mL water, you get my drift? We’re talking serious nutrition here....

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