Posts Tagged "diet"

Immune Boosting: Change of Season Soup with Chicken and Root Vegetables

Posted by on Oct 14, 2015 in Recipes | Comments Off on Immune Boosting: Change of Season Soup with Chicken and Root Vegetables

Immune Boosting: Change of Season Soup with Chicken and Root Vegetables

Change of Season Soup with Chicken and Root Vegetables Using delicious fall harvest staples, this soup is great for helping boost the immune system as seasons change,  and keeps us warm during the cold winter months. Serves 3-4 INGREDIENTS 1 chicken cut into 4 to 8 pieces 3-4 cloves of garlic 3-4 onions A few slices of fresh ginger 1 cup of sliced horseradish or parsley root 2 spoons sesame oil 2 pieces of dried tangerine skin 1 cinnamon stick 250g squash/ pumpkin 3-4 pieces of black Chinese mushrooms 1 tablespoon miso paste ½ teaspoon black pepper INSTRUCTIONS Soak the mushrooms for 30-40 min before cooking. Sauté the onions and ginger until golden-brown and add the garlic and chicken. Sauté for few minutes and add all the other ingredients. Cover in water and bring to a boil. Simmer for 1 hour. During the last 5-10 minutes, add the miso paste and the black pepper....

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Healthy Ingredients: Kale Salad with Roasted Beets and Crunchy Almonds

Posted by on Sep 9, 2015 in Recipes | Comments Off on Healthy Ingredients: Kale Salad with Roasted Beets and Crunchy Almonds

Healthy Ingredients: Kale Salad with Roasted Beets and Crunchy Almonds

Kale Salad with Roasted Beets and Crunchy Almonds Serves 3-4 This salad contains ingredients that can help the body deal with high estrogen levels (basically manage estrogen dominance). Soluble fibre in the beets can help the body clear excess estrogen. Also, kale contains indole-3- carbinol, a nutrient that seems to play a role in how estrogen is metabolized in the body. In addition, the beets and garlic support the liver, If your liver is not functioning properly it can lead to hormonal imbalances as the liver is unable to clear excess estrogen. Supporting the liver is a crucial step in dealing with hormonal issues. INGREDIENTS 6 medium beets, washed, dried and peeled extra-virgin olive oil, as needed ½ tsp garlic powder salt and pepper 1 bunch kale, washed, dried, ribs removed, roughly chopped ¼ medium red onion, thinly sliced 4 tbsp slivered almonds, lightly toasted Garlic-Hummus Dressing ⅓ cup hummus 3 cloves of garlic ¼ cup nutritional yeast ¼ cup fresh lemon juice 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil 1-2 tbsp water salt & pepper to taste INSTRUCTIONS Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Take peeled beets and cut them into 1½ inch wedges. Place on a lightly oiled baking sheet and sprinkle with garlic powder, salt and pepper. Toss with a little olive oil making sure beets are well-coated. Then, place the beets on the middle rack of preheated oven and roast for 45 minutes, tossing/turning beets twice. While beets are in the oven, prepare the garlic-hummus dressing. Blend all the ingredients in a food processor until smooth. Add more water, if necessary, to get the desired consistency. When beets are tender to your liking, remove from oven and let them cool slightly. In a large bowl, combine kale and the garlic-hummus dressing. Massage the dressing into the leaves for a few minutes until the leaves begin the soften. Add the beets and sliced red onions to the salad. Garnish the salad with almonds and serve immediately with a protein of your choice (vegan/vegetarian/meat/seafood)....

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Eat For Spring according to Classical Chinese Medicine

Posted by on Apr 7, 2014 in Featured, Health, How-To's | Comments Off on Eat For Spring according to Classical Chinese Medicine

Eat For Spring according to Classical Chinese Medicine

(Image: “Asparagus” by SOMMAI/ FreeDigitalPhotos.net) Spring is finally here! Even though the temperatures are still colder than we’d like, it’s clear that the spring is here. The days are longer and the sounds of birds can be heard clearly. A fundamental of every traditional medicine, including the Chinese, is that humans need to be aligned with nature and the natural environment which means adapting habits and activities according to the changes in the seasons and in nature. For every season there are recommended activities and specific nutritional requirements. Spring is the time when nature renews and rejuvenates itself emerging from the slow activities of winter. Green begins to emerge as the dominant colour. The corresponding organ in our body is the Liver. As the liver is responsible for cleaning blood and removing toxins from the system, it plays a vital function in keeping the immune system healthy and strong. Spring is also the time for us to get back to increasing our physical activity which is in sync with the role of the liver in controlling the function and flexibility of the muscles and tendons we use to move our body. Generally speaking, our spring diet should be rich with the things that resonate with the springtime energies: vegetables (especially green leafy ones), sprouts, and fresh fruits. When it comes to food groups, the following are most recommended for the season: Grains – Spelt, rye, oat and wheat. (35% of the meal) Legumes – Peas, Mung-beam. (5%-20%) Vegetables – All green leafs, green onion, leak, artichoke, asparagus, aromatic herbs such as parsley, coriander and dill and root vegetables like radish, daikon and even leak. (Vegetables ideally make up 50% of the meal with 5%-10% of the meal should containing protein, though it’s recommended not to overeat animal protein. Easier to digest and more appropriate for spring are fish, chicken, and chicken liver. If you are able to, it’s a great time to cut out all animal protein. Combining grains and legumes in the same meal provide the perfect protein.) Healthy fats such as avocado, nuts and sesame can be added to meals as well as sea vegetables such as Wakame and Spirulina. Spices – Aromatic ones: curcumin, star anise, hours-radish, fennel seeds, rosemary, and mint. Cooking methods should also be attuned to spring energies. Cooking times should be faster. Rather than the stews and soups we had during winter, we now want to do more juicing, steaming, wok cooking and sautéing. Enjoy your cooking and have a blooming and sunny...

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New Year Resolutions: Achieve Your Goals for 2014

Posted by on Jan 1, 2014 in Featured, Health, How-To's | Comments Off on New Year Resolutions: Achieve Your Goals for 2014

New Year Resolutions: Achieve Your Goals for 2014

This New Year it seems that, yet again, everyone is making resolutions. Do you have a resolution for 2014 but aren’t sure how to see it through? Choosing a method or strategy for reaching your goals can be overwhelming.  Not to worry, though, Source Centre is here to help you achieve your New Year’s resolutions. Read on for a list of common New Year resolutions, and what Source Centre can do to help you accomplish your goals for 2014. Lose Weight and Get Fit As the most common New Year resolution, the commitment to getting fit is the reason why it is impossible to snag a treadmill at the gym the first few months of the year. Everyone is there with the same goal, trying to lose weight and get into shape. Source Centre would like to offer other options besides the gym, where you don’t have to fight over gym equipment or a space to lay down your mat. Join us at Source Centre every Monday night at 7:30pm for Yoga with Leila. Starting January 9th, every Thursday Source Centre will also be hosting a Pilates class with Alwynn Taylor at 8:00am. Quit Smoking Quitting smoking is no easy task, especially after holiday stress. Add in the short dark days of winter, and the constant cold, and quitting smoking may seem virtually impossible. However, studies have shown that chiropractic therapy can help dissolve addiction. Brain function relies on normal structural integrity and joint movement in the spine. An abnormal position or movement of spinal vertebra can lead to nerve interference, distorting communication between the spinal cord and brain. Known as “vertebral subluxation,” it is this disruption between the brain and the spinal cord that chiropractic work focuses on. These subluxations interfere with the brain’s reward system, resulting in the need for an individual to escape undesirable feelings such as withdrawal from nicotine. At Source Centre our chiropractors Dr. Leo Quan and Dr. Allison Barriscale can help you quit smoking by restoring your spine and inner reward system to it’s full functioning state. Eat Healthier and Diet This New Year resolution has the potential to actually do your body more harm than good. It is important not to confuse eating healthier with eating less, but rather eating more nutritious foods and less empty calories with minimal nutritional value. Whether your desire to eat healthier stems from wanting to lose weight, gain weight, reduce disease risk, or live with a food allergy, our nutrition services can provide the support you need to successfully accomplish your New Year resolution. For nutritional counseling, contact Nutritionist, Fumie Yamaguchi , or our Naturopath, Tara Andresen. Get More Sleep Getting enough sleep is an essential part of keeping your body healthy. Not only is sleep crucial for brain function and memory consolidation, but lack of sleep can lead to undesired weight gain. How can Source Centre help? Somato Respiratory Integration (SRI) connects the body’s inner rhythms with focused attention, gentle breath, movement and touch. By expanding your body awareness you can help your body relax, helping you not only to fall asleep, but to also sleep more deeply. Still not quite sure what SRI is? Join Source Centre January 15th, January 29th, and February 13th for introductory workshops to SRI. Be Less Stressed Reducing your stress level goes hand-in-hand with getting more sleep. If your goal is to be less stressed in 2014, Source Centre has a variety of services that can help you achieve your objective. Need a stress management plan? Source Centre will be hosting a Stress Management workshopon January 15th at 7:30pm....

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Eating More Fibre

Posted by on Nov 18, 2013 in Featured, Health, Uncategorized | Comments Off on Eating More Fibre

Eating More Fibre

(Image: ‘Red Bean Black Bean Rice Grain’ by khunaspix/ FreeDigitalPhotos.net) Whether you have been told by a practitioner, or simply heard the recommendation on a TV advertisement, it is likely that you are not consuming enough fibre in your daily diet. The average North American does not consume enough fibre in their diet. The recommendation is to consume roughly 28 grams of fibre per day, but North Americans tend to consume just half that. Too little fibre in the diet can cause digestive problems as well as more serious problems if levels are consistently low. There are two basic types of fibre, insoluble and soluble. Insoluble fibre adds bulk to your diet and aids in normal bowel movements and colon health. Whole grains, bran, nuts, fruits and vegetables are good sources of insoluble fibres. Soluble fibre is found in oats, beans, peas, apples and other fruit, and berries. It has been shown to lower cholesterol levels and reduce the risk of heart disease. Fibre’s effects have also widely been studied in what is termed the “second meal effect” of dietary fibre. The second meal effect states that consuming a fibre rich meal not only increases satiety at the time of consumption, but it also has the potential to decrease the blood glucose response in the next meal. This is to say that consuming fibre will make the body more responsive to insulin in a subsequent meal, therefore clearing blood glucose (sugar) from the meal more readily for efficient usage. There are some simple ways to increase your fibre consumption. Read food labels to see whether or not the food has added fibre benefits. Chose whole grain breads, and add vegetables to your meals. Top salads with beans and nuts. When consuming more fibre than normal, it is important to consume plenty of liquids in an effort to minimize gastrointestinal discomfort. Looking for some help in getting on track with your nutrition? A nutritionist can...

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