Posts Tagged "Classical Chinese Medicine"

Immune Boosting: Change of Season Soup with Chicken and Root Vegetables

Posted by on Oct 14, 2015 in Recipes | Comments Off on Immune Boosting: Change of Season Soup with Chicken and Root Vegetables

Immune Boosting: Change of Season Soup with Chicken and Root Vegetables

Change of Season Soup with Chicken and Root Vegetables Using delicious fall harvest staples, this soup is great for helping boost the immune system as seasons change,  and keeps us warm during the cold winter months. Serves 3-4 INGREDIENTS 1 chicken cut into 4 to 8 pieces 3-4 cloves of garlic 3-4 onions A few slices of fresh ginger 1 cup of sliced horseradish or parsley root 2 spoons sesame oil 2 pieces of dried tangerine skin 1 cinnamon stick 250g squash/ pumpkin 3-4 pieces of black Chinese mushrooms 1 tablespoon miso paste ½ teaspoon black pepper INSTRUCTIONS Soak the mushrooms for 30-40 min before cooking. Sauté the onions and ginger until golden-brown and add the garlic and chicken. Sauté for few minutes and add all the other ingredients. Cover in water and bring to a boil. Simmer for 1 hour. During the last 5-10 minutes, add the miso paste and the black pepper....

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Eat For Spring according to Classical Chinese Medicine

Posted by on Apr 7, 2014 in Featured, Health, How-To's | Comments Off on Eat For Spring according to Classical Chinese Medicine

Eat For Spring according to Classical Chinese Medicine

(Image: “Asparagus” by SOMMAI/ FreeDigitalPhotos.net) Spring is finally here! Even though the temperatures are still colder than we’d like, it’s clear that the spring is here. The days are longer and the sounds of birds can be heard clearly. A fundamental of every traditional medicine, including the Chinese, is that humans need to be aligned with nature and the natural environment which means adapting habits and activities according to the changes in the seasons and in nature. For every season there are recommended activities and specific nutritional requirements. Spring is the time when nature renews and rejuvenates itself emerging from the slow activities of winter. Green begins to emerge as the dominant colour. The corresponding organ in our body is the Liver. As the liver is responsible for cleaning blood and removing toxins from the system, it plays a vital function in keeping the immune system healthy and strong. Spring is also the time for us to get back to increasing our physical activity which is in sync with the role of the liver in controlling the function and flexibility of the muscles and tendons we use to move our body. Generally speaking, our spring diet should be rich with the things that resonate with the springtime energies: vegetables (especially green leafy ones), sprouts, and fresh fruits. When it comes to food groups, the following are most recommended for the season: Grains – Spelt, rye, oat and wheat. (35% of the meal) Legumes – Peas, Mung-beam. (5%-20%) Vegetables – All green leafs, green onion, leak, artichoke, asparagus, aromatic herbs such as parsley, coriander and dill and root vegetables like radish, daikon and even leak. (Vegetables ideally make up 50% of the meal with 5%-10% of the meal should containing protein, though it’s recommended not to overeat animal protein. Easier to digest and more appropriate for spring are fish, chicken, and chicken liver. If you are able to, it’s a great time to cut out all animal protein. Combining grains and legumes in the same meal provide the perfect protein.) Healthy fats such as avocado, nuts and sesame can be added to meals as well as sea vegetables such as Wakame and Spirulina. Spices – Aromatic ones: curcumin, star anise, hours-radish, fennel seeds, rosemary, and mint. Cooking methods should also be attuned to spring energies. Cooking times should be faster. Rather than the stews and soups we had during winter, we now want to do more juicing, steaming, wok cooking and sautéing. Enjoy your cooking and have a blooming and sunny...

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To Sense from the Heart

Posted by on Sep 5, 2013 in Featured, Quotes & Thoughts, Uncategorized | Comments Off on To Sense from the Heart

To Sense from the Heart

As humans, we are blessed with the ability to sense the exterior world through our 5 senses. How does this really work? Can we train or sharpen our senses to enhance and improve the way we experience our day-to-day life? Or is it maybe that some of us are gifted with special sensory talents? While it’s true that some of us have a better musical ear or a more sensitive palate able to discern many flavors, I believe with some practice and attention we can all sharpen our senses and enjoy a richer, fuller life. All we need to do is to practice. Sound simple? Well… it is. For example, when practicing yoga we learn how to breathe and how to lead our breath to a targeted area in our body. While meditating we learn how to train our mind and clear our thoughts. We learn how to let thoughts go when they arise, rather than holding on to them. Sensing is a practice pertaining to the heart. When the heart is involved in even little and seemingly banal actions, life can become more meaningful. Teaching the heart to be open and clear can allow us to feel and sense the world in an entirely different way. When giving our full attention to our senses, hearing becomes listening, looking becomes seeing, smelling becomes experiencing, tasting becomes nourishing, and touching becomes communicating. Our senses become embodied and emotional. To feel and be emotional is to be alive. In physiology, as described by ancient Chinese medicine, each one of our senses passes through an internal meridian in the heart before being processed in our body and our consciousness. When we actively operate this channel, we can feel the external world and become united with it. We can then feel truly connected and at one with everything....

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About Maintenance

Posted by on May 15, 2013 in Featured, Health | Comments Off on About Maintenance

About Maintenance

(Image: ‘Girl Doing cartwheel At Beach’ by imagerymajestic / FreeDigitalPhotos.net) Life in the western half of the world teaches us that if something’s not broken, don’t fix it. Therefore, when one is “healthy” there is no reason to go to the doctor. It’s only when one finds one’s self “unhealthy”, that it’s time to go find a cure, see a doctor, take medication(s), do whatever will “fix” the problem. This to many of us is the normal way of things. On the other hand, we’re told that we must have an anti-virus installed on the computer and always have it backed-up; we’ve got to change the filter in the furnace and regularly change the oil in the car. In these examples, we’re exhorted not to wait for something to get broken because it will cost us twice as much. Quite frankly, I don’t understand the logic! When we’re talking about our belongings we need to be proactive but not when it’s about our bodies and our health and wellbeing? Maintaining good health in our bodies is something we all can and need to do. It’s also something we ourselves can take the initiative on through the choices we make. What we put in – what and how much we eat and at what times – and what we put on our body. It’s vital to be physically active, to listen to our body’s limits, to ensure we’re getting enough sleep. These are only a few examples of how our personal actions can benefit our health. That being said, there are many therapeutic modalities out there to assist us in achieving and maintaining great health. Many of us are aware of the great benefits of Chinese Medicine in treating a wide variety of conditions, from pain relief to dealing with allergies, emotional stress, anxiety, hormonal imbalances, infertility, and much more. But did you know that, above all else, Chinese Medicine is a preventative medicine? Chinese Medicine as a whole, and especially the “Stems & Branches” method, is designed to be a preventative type of medicine, first and foremost. The ancient Chinese actually developed different techniques to prevent illness and maintain health, that differ from those used to treat a disease.  In the “NEI JING”- the main classic of Chinese Medicine – it is said that a good doctor will get rid of the symptoms and relieve the patient’s suffering. A great doctor will treat the root of the illness and prevent its recurrence. A real master, however, will identify the illness (by pulse diagnosis) before it manifests in the physical body and prevent it from occurring at all. Also consider, in this system the doctor only is paid as long as the patient stays healthy. When someone is sick or suffers from disease, the treatment is free! In our era where healthcare is so costly, think of how wonderful it would be if this was still the way we operated. So my advice to you is to take an active role in your health.  Live right. Eat right. Sleep right. Find the kind of physical activity that fits who you are and allows you to experience joy. And yes, you can use Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture to make sure you stay happy and healthy. Don’t wait for something to get broken. Trust me, it’s much cheaper and more pleasant if you don’t.   Yours In Health, Yuval Blum...

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Say Good-bye to Your Allergies this Spring

Posted by on Apr 22, 2013 in Featured, Health, How-To's | Comments Off on Say Good-bye to Your Allergies this Spring

Say Good-bye to Your Allergies this Spring

(Image: ‘Bee Collection Pollen’ by Tina Phillips / FreeDigitalPhotos.net) Spring is here!! The sun is coming out and the days are getting longer and longer. It’s time to take ourselves out of hibernation and enjoy nature. It’s the season to be active again: to go hiking, biking, kayaking and all other fun outdoor activities. Unless… you have spring allergies. Then, when it comes to outdoor activities, viewing friends’ and family’s pictures on Instagram is all you get. If this scenario sounds familiar we have some good news for you. Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine are proven to reduce and even eliminate all kinds of allergic symptoms. How does it work? Most allergy symptoms are characterized by hay fever manifesting in irritated, red, itchy and watery eyes; runny and congested nose; and skin rashes and hives. These symptoms are caused by an overreaction of the immune system which releases histamines to fight a substance which is usually harmless. According to Classical Chinese Medicine, all of the above are related to the organ/function called Liver (remember, organs in Chinese medicine are not limited only to the physical organ). The Liver in Chinese medicine is the organ in charge on the immune system, the eyes, and all the body’s mucus membranes.  Through the use of acupuncture and Chinese herbal remedies, the practitioner can affect the function of the liver and harmonize it. By achieving this harmony we see a normal and balanced functioning of the immune system which will not overreact to harmless substances. The wonderful results of such treatment (which is safe and natural) can be life altering to a person who suffers from allergies. So, interested in joining your friends on their next camping trip??       ...

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