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Bring Home the Bacon… but less of it please.

Posted by on Nov 9, 2015 in Featured, Health, Short Entries | Comments Off on Bring Home the Bacon… but less of it please.

Bring Home the Bacon… but less of it please.

At the end of October, the World Health Organization (WHO) unwittingly upset the carnivore world by releasing scientific evidence that bacon causes cancer[1], or more specifically processed meats and possibly red meat in general. But how is this possible? Processed meat simply means that it has been modified to either extend its shelf-life or change the taste, through smoking, curing, salting or adding preservatives. Researchers believe that the Chinese started salting pork in 1,500 BC as a means of extending its shelf-life through the harsh winters. In the middle ages in Britain, bacon consumption was restricted to peasants only because it’s made primarily from the cheap fatty parts of the pig, but only once or twice a week. And then along came Oscar Mayer in the 20s revolutionizing the meat industry by pre-packaging all kinds of different processed meats, including hot dogs, sausages, corned beef and bacon, making it easier to consume even more. Which we did! In the last 4 years, North Americans have consumed more bacon than ever – in 2013, it made over $4 billion in sales. This is why scientists have decided to take a closer look at just how good these strips of greasy deliciousness are for us. Which brings us to the newest reports: the chemicals involved in making processed meats – including the sodium nitrite found in the brine – along with high temperature cooking, such as on a barbeque which creates carcinogenic chemicals, could be increasing the risk of cancer. And this last point is why bacon has been placed in Group 1 of carcinogens, the same category as smoking, causing much ire among the salted-smoky meat-loving community. So is bacon really as bad as smoking? Smoking increases your risk of lung cancer by 2,500%; eating 2 slices of bacon a day increases your risk of colorectal cancer by 18 percent[2]. So even if you ate more than 10 pieces of bacon a day, you still wouldn’t be at the same risk level as a smoker. The key here is MODERATION – lots of things are bad for you if done in excess, including exercise, but a few pieces of salted goodness once or twice a week are not going to land you on the slab at the morgue any sooner. Just make sure to balance them out with some great colon cleansers like dark leafy greens!   [1] http://www.iarc.fr/en/media-centre/pr/2015/pdfs/pr240_E.pdf [2] http://www.wired.com/2015/10/who-does-bacon-cause-cancer-sort-of-but-not-really/  ...

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Reconnecting with Help from Lana

Posted by on Oct 15, 2015 in Featured, Health, Short Entries | Comments Off on Reconnecting with Help from Lana

Reconnecting with Help from Lana

While reading this article, I was once again reminded how incredibly lucky we are here in North America, but at the same time, how globally women are still considered the ‘other’, and how we are often left to feel disconnected within ourselves. I’m very fortunate to be surrounded by great healers at Source Centre, including Lana Kevic who offers Reiki, Womb Healings, and The Art of Feminine Presence to help me reconnect with my true self. I recently asked Lana about the work she does, and here’s what she had to say…   Lana Kevic, Art of Feminine Presence, Womb Blessing What led you to focus on energy work like that involved in Womb Blessing and Reiki? I enjoy working with women who are interested in exploring and connecting to their femininity, and this is unique work. Often a disconnect manifests itself as an issue affecting a woman’s reproductive organs or it could just be a sense of missing something, a longing to discover who they really are, what they are passionate about and what they want in their lives. Then to be able to articulate and receive it! I also enjoy doing energy work with men. Men also benefit from connecting to their power source, their centre and finding the paths to deep relaxation and healing. What are you proud of in your practice? In my practice, I love facilitating people’s connection to themselves and their intuition. Over time, this also becomes expressed as a deep love and appreciation for themselves which grows self-esteem and confidence. It is very moving to me to witness. Why should patients see you? ​I really love what I do and I believe in it. I have witnessed many a transformation. The growing awareness and embrace of energy work is allowing access to many to heal deep issues, because often what there is to heal is underneath our conscious awareness. We don’t actually have to try or strive. We just keep an open heart and mind and say yes to the journey. ​ Interested in reconnecting with your essence? Please call Lana directly at 416-820-2754 to book an appointment.  ...

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Immune Boosting: Change of Season Soup with Chicken and Root Vegetables

Posted by on Oct 14, 2015 in Recipes | Comments Off on Immune Boosting: Change of Season Soup with Chicken and Root Vegetables

Immune Boosting: Change of Season Soup with Chicken and Root Vegetables

Change of Season Soup with Chicken and Root Vegetables Using delicious fall harvest staples, this soup is great for helping boost the immune system as seasons change,  and keeps us warm during the cold winter months. Serves 3-4 INGREDIENTS 1 chicken cut into 4 to 8 pieces 3-4 cloves of garlic 3-4 onions A few slices of fresh ginger 1 cup of sliced horseradish or parsley root 2 spoons sesame oil 2 pieces of dried tangerine skin 1 cinnamon stick 250g squash/ pumpkin 3-4 pieces of black Chinese mushrooms 1 tablespoon miso paste ½ teaspoon black pepper INSTRUCTIONS Soak the mushrooms for 30-40 min before cooking. Sauté the onions and ginger until golden-brown and add the garlic and chicken. Sauté for few minutes and add all the other ingredients. Cover in water and bring to a boil. Simmer for 1 hour. During the last 5-10 minutes, add the miso paste and the black pepper....

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Autumn – One Step Before The Long Cold Winter

Posted by on Oct 13, 2015 in Featured, Health, Short Entries | Comments Off on Autumn – One Step Before The Long Cold Winter

Autumn – One Step Before The Long Cold Winter

According to ancient Chinese Philosophy the man is a representative of the universe. He’s a  microcosm of the macrocosms. Therefore, it is man’s desire to become one with nature and live according to its rules. One of the basic but most important ways to connect with nature is to synchronize life’s activities with the changing of the seasons. Among the five elements, the autumn season is controlled by the metal element. The action of metal is to cut; cut and separate the unnecessary from the necessary, to keep what’s needed and get rid of the waste. Autumn is a time to store everything that is essential and necessary for survival, and let go of all the excess from the the summer. In the natural world, we see animals trying to gain weight, store food, and prepare their homes to be warm and cozy in preparation for the long winter months ahead. Trees are no longer giving fruits and leaves fall down to the earth, all in an effort to preserve energy. For many of us, the fall is a time where we “get back to work” and return to our busy routines. Many people will work exceptionally hard as the seasons change, but without balance, they find themselves burnt out by the time November comes around. For human beings, autumn presents a time to find a healthy balance between work/family/school routines and self-care. It is a time to slow down and recover from the summer’s fast-paced activities. It encourages us to look into ourselves in an introspective way and do some internal emotional cleansing. It’s a good time for moderate physical activities like yoga, tai chi, meditation or other deep breathing exercises. The typical climate of autumn is a chilly, dry wind. According to Chinese Medicine, the wind is a “carrier” of external pathogens like viruses and bacteria. These winds tend to penetrate the body through the neck and the back of the neck; for women the lower abdominal region is another area of susceptibility. To strengthen our “immune system” energy, it is very important to keep these areas warm and covered. It is also very important to adjust our diet. It is a good time to eat concentrated foods with a contracted quality, like nuts, brown rice of any kind, legumes (especially  lentils), and an assortment of root vegetables like radishes, kohlrabi, turnips, celery root, and onion & garlic. Change of Season Soup (click here for recipe) is a great addition to the autumn diet as it tonifies the immune system and nourishes the internal organs. Generally, cooking methods appropriate to the fall season will be longer, and more warm foods should be consumed – such as soups and stews which are easier on the digestive system and help our bodies cope with the colder temperatures. Sleep is also essential to overall health and strong immunity; as cold and flu season approaches, this is the time to prioritize rest by going to bed earlier and waking at a regular time. Just remember, in order to eat you need to cook first, in the same way, a healthy winter body requires support and preparation through the autumn!   Source Centre is pleased to bring you the Health Topic of the Month. Each month, the team at Source Centre looks at...

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Healthy Ingredients: Kale Salad with Roasted Beets and Crunchy Almonds

Posted by on Sep 9, 2015 in Recipes | Comments Off on Healthy Ingredients: Kale Salad with Roasted Beets and Crunchy Almonds

Healthy Ingredients: Kale Salad with Roasted Beets and Crunchy Almonds

Kale Salad with Roasted Beets and Crunchy Almonds Serves 3-4 This salad contains ingredients that can help the body deal with high estrogen levels (basically manage estrogen dominance). Soluble fibre in the beets can help the body clear excess estrogen. Also, kale contains indole-3- carbinol, a nutrient that seems to play a role in how estrogen is metabolized in the body. In addition, the beets and garlic support the liver, If your liver is not functioning properly it can lead to hormonal imbalances as the liver is unable to clear excess estrogen. Supporting the liver is a crucial step in dealing with hormonal issues. INGREDIENTS 6 medium beets, washed, dried and peeled extra-virgin olive oil, as needed ½ tsp garlic powder salt and pepper 1 bunch kale, washed, dried, ribs removed, roughly chopped ¼ medium red onion, thinly sliced 4 tbsp slivered almonds, lightly toasted Garlic-Hummus Dressing ⅓ cup hummus 3 cloves of garlic ¼ cup nutritional yeast ¼ cup fresh lemon juice 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil 1-2 tbsp water salt & pepper to taste INSTRUCTIONS Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Take peeled beets and cut them into 1½ inch wedges. Place on a lightly oiled baking sheet and sprinkle with garlic powder, salt and pepper. Toss with a little olive oil making sure beets are well-coated. Then, place the beets on the middle rack of preheated oven and roast for 45 minutes, tossing/turning beets twice. While beets are in the oven, prepare the garlic-hummus dressing. Blend all the ingredients in a food processor until smooth. Add more water, if necessary, to get the desired consistency. When beets are tender to your liking, remove from oven and let them cool slightly. In a large bowl, combine kale and the garlic-hummus dressing. Massage the dressing into the leaves for a few minutes until the leaves begin the soften. Add the beets and sliced red onions to the salad. Garnish the salad with almonds and serve immediately with a protein of your choice (vegan/vegetarian/meat/seafood)....

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