Posts by Yuval Blum

Classical Chinese Medicine vs. Traditional Chinese Medicine

Posted by on Aug 3, 2016 in Featured | Comments Off on Classical Chinese Medicine vs. Traditional Chinese Medicine

Classical Chinese Medicine vs. Traditional Chinese Medicine

The popular treatment known as Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is actually a modern modification of the +2000 year-old Chinese Medicine and was formed in the early-mid 20th century. In the formation of TCM, important philosophical and practical doctrines from Classical Chinese Medicine (CCM) were left behind in order to simplify the medicine and to train new practitioners. By simplifying the medicine, some of the deepest theoretical tools were neglected and in time forgotten. I was very fortunate to study some of this ancient knowledge in my formal training and have continuing learning form the world’s leading experts teaching the classical theories. Here are some of the main differences between Classical Chinese Medicine vs. Traditional Chinese Medicine: CCM TCM Health is an active process of nourishing life in order to maximize one’s potential Health defined as the absence of symptoms and ailments Individual diagnosis and  treatment Standardized diagnosis and treatment Treating according to individual assessment in conjunction with universal factors of time & space Treating according to patterns using formulas of points Treating the whole person in a holistic approach Treating separate symptoms and systems in the body Mind is primary to body Body is primary to mind Treating according to one’s personal qi and constitution People with similar patterns will be treated similarly Different treatment according to gender No difference between genders Different treatment according to season No consideration to the season Different techniques for treating existing conditions and preventing future ailments Similar principles for treatment and prevention...

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Immune Boosting: Change of Season Soup with Chicken and Root Vegetables

Posted by on Oct 14, 2015 in Recipes | Comments Off on Immune Boosting: Change of Season Soup with Chicken and Root Vegetables

Immune Boosting: Change of Season Soup with Chicken and Root Vegetables

Change of Season Soup with Chicken and Root Vegetables Using delicious fall harvest staples, this soup is great for helping boost the immune system as seasons change,  and keeps us warm during the cold winter months. Serves 3-4 INGREDIENTS 1 chicken cut into 4 to 8 pieces 3-4 cloves of garlic 3-4 onions A few slices of fresh ginger 1 cup of sliced horseradish or parsley root 2 spoons sesame oil 2 pieces of dried tangerine skin 1 cinnamon stick 250g squash/ pumpkin 3-4 pieces of black Chinese mushrooms 1 tablespoon miso paste ½ teaspoon black pepper INSTRUCTIONS Soak the mushrooms for 30-40 min before cooking. Sauté the onions and ginger until golden-brown and add the garlic and chicken. Sauté for few minutes and add all the other ingredients. Cover in water and bring to a boil. Simmer for 1 hour. During the last 5-10 minutes, add the miso paste and the black pepper....

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Autumn – One Step Before The Long Cold Winter

Posted by on Oct 13, 2015 in Featured, Health, Short Entries | Comments Off on Autumn – One Step Before The Long Cold Winter

Autumn – One Step Before The Long Cold Winter

According to ancient Chinese Philosophy the man is a representative of the universe. He’s a  microcosm of the macrocosms. Therefore, it is man’s desire to become one with nature and live according to its rules. One of the basic but most important ways to connect with nature is to synchronize life’s activities with the changing of the seasons. Among the five elements, the autumn season is controlled by the metal element. The action of metal is to cut; cut and separate the unnecessary from the necessary, to keep what’s needed and get rid of the waste. Autumn is a time to store everything that is essential and necessary for survival, and let go of all the excess from the the summer. In the natural world, we see animals trying to gain weight, store food, and prepare their homes to be warm and cozy in preparation for the long winter months ahead. Trees are no longer giving fruits and leaves fall down to the earth, all in an effort to preserve energy. For many of us, the fall is a time where we “get back to work” and return to our busy routines. Many people will work exceptionally hard as the seasons change, but without balance, they find themselves burnt out by the time November comes around. For human beings, autumn presents a time to find a healthy balance between work/family/school routines and self-care. It is a time to slow down and recover from the summer’s fast-paced activities. It encourages us to look into ourselves in an introspective way and do some internal emotional cleansing. It’s a good time for moderate physical activities like yoga, tai chi, meditation or other deep breathing exercises. The typical climate of autumn is a chilly, dry wind. According to Chinese Medicine, the wind is a “carrier” of external pathogens like viruses and bacteria. These winds tend to penetrate the body through the neck and the back of the neck; for women the lower abdominal region is another area of susceptibility. To strengthen our “immune system” energy, it is very important to keep these areas warm and covered. It is also very important to adjust our diet. It is a good time to eat concentrated foods with a contracted quality, like nuts, brown rice of any kind, legumes (especially  lentils), and an assortment of root vegetables like radishes, kohlrabi, turnips, celery root, and onion & garlic. Change of Season Soup (click here for recipe) is a great addition to the autumn diet as it tonifies the immune system and nourishes the internal organs. Generally, cooking methods appropriate to the fall season will be longer, and more warm foods should be consumed – such as soups and stews which are easier on the digestive system and help our bodies cope with the colder temperatures. Sleep is also essential to overall health and strong immunity; as cold and flu season approaches, this is the time to prioritize rest by going to bed earlier and waking at a regular time. Just remember, in order to eat you need to cook first, in the same way, a healthy winter body requires support and preparation through the autumn!   Source Centre is pleased to bring you the Health Topic of the Month. Each month, the team at Source Centre looks at a health issue that’s making waves, breaking the news, and even sparking controversy. Health Topic of the Month gives you professional insight on today’s hot-button health issues from leaders in alternative health....

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How Acupuncture Treatments Changed a Man’s Life

Posted by on Mar 16, 2015 in Featured, Health | Comments Off on How Acupuncture Treatments Changed a Man’s Life

How Acupuncture Treatments Changed a Man’s Life

While most people associate Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine with the treatment of pain, it can also be a very effective treatment for internal conditions. Randy started acupuncture due to constant upper back pain. He also suffers from Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). As a university professor who focuses in research, Randy spends most his hours in front of a computer. While assessing his posture, it’s clear that a few minor posture changes would make big difference for him. We decide to put most of the focus on his digestive system while checking if posture changes would alleviate the upper back pain. The digestive system symptoms are mostly bloating, gassiness, and urgent “explosive” stools. All medical tests had come back negative, and couldn’t provide him any solution for this condition. While examining his diet and eating habits, 3 main trends became clear to me. Randy comsumes a lot of “cold” and uncooked food (smoothies, salads, sandwiches…); He often skips meals due to his very busy schedule; He always eats while he’s working or reading. This is a classic case that is described in Chinese Medicine as “weak digestive system.” The digestive system, in the eyes of Chinese Medicine, enjoys regularity. In the 5-element method, it belongs to the Earth element. Earth is stable, steady and moves in regular rhythm. Therefore, regularity in eating hours is very important. Another very important aspect of healthy digestion is that eating is a full body activity. It is recommended not to eat while working, reading, watching TV etc. When we eat, we need to eat! Above all, the most important guidance I could give Randy was to consume more warm and cooked food, and stop the cold raw foods, including ice cold drinks, smoothies, ice-cream and salads. The cold slows digestion and “allows” food to rot in our body. The digestive system is a system that prefers heat, and dislikes cold. In Chinese Medicine, this is the most important aspect of healthy digestion. It is now known that most digestive enzymes function better at temperature of 38-42 degrees… After a 6 week treatment plan that consisted of weekly acupuncture with a focus on digestive health, along with close monitoring and guidance with his diet, all symptoms have been resolved. His bowels are normal and in good consistency. He is no longer gassy or bloated. And his upper back pains are no longer an...

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Eat For Spring according to Classical Chinese Medicine

Posted by on Apr 7, 2014 in Featured, Health, How-To's | Comments Off on Eat For Spring according to Classical Chinese Medicine

Eat For Spring according to Classical Chinese Medicine

(Image: “Asparagus” by SOMMAI/ FreeDigitalPhotos.net) Spring is finally here! Even though the temperatures are still colder than we’d like, it’s clear that the spring is here. The days are longer and the sounds of birds can be heard clearly. A fundamental of every traditional medicine, including the Chinese, is that humans need to be aligned with nature and the natural environment which means adapting habits and activities according to the changes in the seasons and in nature. For every season there are recommended activities and specific nutritional requirements. Spring is the time when nature renews and rejuvenates itself emerging from the slow activities of winter. Green begins to emerge as the dominant colour. The corresponding organ in our body is the Liver. As the liver is responsible for cleaning blood and removing toxins from the system, it plays a vital function in keeping the immune system healthy and strong. Spring is also the time for us to get back to increasing our physical activity which is in sync with the role of the liver in controlling the function and flexibility of the muscles and tendons we use to move our body. Generally speaking, our spring diet should be rich with the things that resonate with the springtime energies: vegetables (especially green leafy ones), sprouts, and fresh fruits. When it comes to food groups, the following are most recommended for the season: Grains – Spelt, rye, oat and wheat. (35% of the meal) Legumes – Peas, Mung-beam. (5%-20%) Vegetables – All green leafs, green onion, leak, artichoke, asparagus, aromatic herbs such as parsley, coriander and dill and root vegetables like radish, daikon and even leak. (Vegetables ideally make up 50% of the meal with 5%-10% of the meal should containing protein, though it’s recommended not to overeat animal protein. Easier to digest and more appropriate for spring are fish, chicken, and chicken liver. If you are able to, it’s a great time to cut out all animal protein. Combining grains and legumes in the same meal provide the perfect protein.) Healthy fats such as avocado, nuts and sesame can be added to meals as well as sea vegetables such as Wakame and Spirulina. Spices – Aromatic ones: curcumin, star anise, hours-radish, fennel seeds, rosemary, and mint. Cooking methods should also be attuned to spring energies. Cooking times should be faster. Rather than the stews and soups we had during winter, we now want to do more juicing, steaming, wok cooking and sautéing. Enjoy your cooking and have a blooming and sunny...

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