Posts by Leo Quan

Internship Program

Posted by on May 6, 2013 in Events, Featured | Comments Off on Internship Program

Internship Program

SET THE TREND THIS SPRING Want marketing experience and leadership training? Accelerate your career in event planning? Work in the heart of Downtown Toronto in the health and wellness industry? Source Centre has 8-week internships starting immediately.   Get trained to grow a business and to develop your leadership skills.   Email drleoquan@sourcecentre.ca with resume.   Tweet...

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NanoWorkouts in May

Posted by on May 3, 2013 in Featured, Health, How-To's | Comments Off on NanoWorkouts in May

NanoWorkouts in May

Not enough time to fit in a full workout? I find a lot of people are in the same situation. 10 hour days at work. Meals. Commuting. Family. Chores. School. Is it exhausting to even imagine this? Everyone has the same 24 hours in a day, so how can we fit in some activity and make a difference to our health and well-being? Joakim Christoffersson a busy professional himself saw the need for quick easy workouts in his life and created Nano Workouts. Nano Workouts are small micro workouts that we can do at the office, during our commute and at home. They’re quick exercises that stretch and strengthen our bodies. Pick and choose based on the situation you’re in. Take joy, no equipment is needed.  “A small amount of exercise many times becomes a lot when added up,” say Christoffersson. For the month of May, Source Centre is featuring Nano Workouts and sharing different workouts each week. Come by our centre to get your next workout! For more information, visit http://www.nanoworkout.com.   If you enjoyed this post, I’d be very grateful if you’d help it spread by emailing it to a friend, or sharing it on Twitter or Facebook. Tweet...

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Pain – The Good, the Bad and the Chronic

Posted by on Apr 2, 2013 in Featured, Health | Comments Off on Pain – The Good, the Bad and the Chronic

Pain – The Good, the Bad and the Chronic

Tell me if this sounds familiar or if you can relate: Peter is having a down day. His back is aching really badly, more than normal. There’s no will to get up from bed. Before she left their apartment for work, Peter’s wife Jackie gave him the daily pep talk, “Oh, come on, I know you can do this!” When Peter looked away, she told him it’s all in his head, and to “just deal with it.” As Jackie closes the door behind her, Peter angrily throws the pillow in her direction. Peter took his last pain-killer last night. He can barely hold the thought to get a refill at the pharmacy. It just hurts too much. As a chiropractor in downtown Toronto that works with people who suffer from chronic pain I hear personal stories like this all of the time. People who suffer from chronic pain may look fine – they don’t necessarily have an obvious injury like a broken arm or leg but their pain is very real and constant through every moment of their day.   Do you know someone who suffers from chronic pain or know someone who does? Unlike acute pain, chronic pain can last for months or even years. Chronic pain can stem from an obvious incident such as a motor vehicle collision, infection or arthritis, but not always. Chronic pain can affect all aspects of life, causing strain on families and relationships and make home and work responsibilities a challenge. People suffering from chronic pain often deal with anger, frustration, depression, mental fog and social isolation. Some venture into drug abuse and even contemplate suicide.   What’s the positive side of pain? Pain can be an incredibly useful signal that we are living out of balance. For example, consider an office worker who cradles the phone in his shoulder for hours and feels pain in the very same area at the end of the day. Here, the body is speaking up about the misalignment. Where in life do you experience pain? If there was something out of balance, what would it be? How would you address it? For a short-lived aches and pain, dealing with the imbalance could be simple. “Stop doing whatever you were doing” is an obvious answer and works really well for the office worker example above. Stop putting your body out of alignment and the signals will stop too – genius! It’s a simple example of how a healthy lifestyle choice can dramatically affect pain. For the chronic pain sufferer, life is not so simple. Rather than an unhealthy lifestyle being the source of pain, it’s often the other way around. Chronic pain itself can be the primary source of an unhealthy lifestyle. Find this hard to accept, even contradictory? Just like Peter’s wife Jackie, most people are in disbelief or are simply unaware that chronic pain is widespread. Nearly 1 in 5 Canadians suffer from chronic pain according to a recent survey (click for link).   For individuals, families, workplaces and communities dealing with chronic pain who is making a difference? The Toronto Chapter of the Chronic Pain Association (http://www.chronicpaintoronto.com) has created a place where people with chronic pain can gain better understanding of their treatment and management options. It’s a place where caregivers, families, friends, employers and co-workers can access resources and education for chronic pain. It’s where people find hope and meaning to their life. Chronic pain is a very real health challenge for Canadians. It directly impacts the quality of life of individuals and their families and has ripple effects on the workplace...

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Healthy Habits for Travel, Office and Home

Posted by on Jan 4, 2013 in Featured, Health, How-To's | Comments Off on Healthy Habits for Travel, Office and Home

Healthy Habits for Travel, Office and Home

In my previous two posts [ post 1 | post 2 ], I wrote about my amazing experience of Beijing. I still think fondly of my 45 degree climb up the Great Wall of China. Reconnecting with family on our walking tours and over meals was wonderful and rejuvenating. Sharing meals with my new friends made the trip even more joyful. And practising simple healthy habits made it possible to enjoy the experience and feel energetic, happy and relaxed. On my previous post, I mentioned regular Network Spinal Care, daily yoga and healthier food choices were 3 ways that I stayed healthy on my trip. With NSA, I arrived in Beijing with a healthy nervous system and a healthy spine. Daily yoga helped me limber up and start my day with more energy. Healthy meals provided clean-burning fuel to sustain my well-being. The key to health was to continue practising my daily healthy habits and modify them to suit my day. Without further ado, the last of my healthy habits during my Beijing trip!   Early to bed Our days usually started with rising early at 6:00am. I typically need 8 hours of sleep nightly to feel refreshed the next day which meant I was in bed by 10:00pm. This was not the easiest goal as we would return to our hotel room as late as 8:30pm. I got to bed quickly by cutting down on the electronics: namely the television and cell phone. This helped me to maximize my time to wind down from the day with a nice slow shower and personal care. Stay hydrated Experts say that we need at least 2-3 litres of water every day to stay properly hydrated. When counting your intake, remember that beverages and foods are both sources of water. Our tour guide and bus driver provided bottled water during our trip which was very considerate in light of Beijing’s questionable drinking water safety (http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/722561.shtml). A combination of bottled water and lots of fruits and vegetables – both water-rich foods – made it easy for me to stay hydrated.   Keep moving, especially when seated! Do you know what children do after they sit for more than a brief moment? They get restless and move around! This is a perfect reflection of our body’s intelligence to keep tension under control. Every few minutes on my trip, I would lean from one side to the other. Then I’d slouch forward for a few minutes, and then sit upright. I would twist one way, and then twist the other. And of course, if I could safely stand and move around I would do that too. Moving around is important to manage tension. Whether it be on vacation, at home or at the office, if you sit still for more than a few minutes certain tissues in your body will start to compress, stretch and strain. The only way to counteract the load is to switch positions regularly so that the strained tissues get a break and share the load with other parts of your body.   SRI SRI stands for Somato Respiratory Integration (click to read more) and is an incredibly effective tool for enhancing the breath and releasing built-up tension. It’s so simple and that anyone could learn it in a single session and enjoy right away the benefits of regular practice. I used it to help me to sleep each night as well as whenever I felt tension build up. There are 12 different stages of SRI that can be practised, and the simplest and most frequent stage I practice is stage 1. See below...

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Healthy Travels

Posted by on Dec 3, 2012 in Featured, Health, How-To's | Comments Off on Healthy Travels

Healthy Travels

Want to enjoy the sightseeing, the company with fellow travelers, and the local cuisine while staying healthy along the way? I found myself in this very scenario while travelling to Beijing in October 2012 (and wrote about it on my previous blog post here). Beijing is an amazing place full of countless opportunities for touring, shopping and enjoying the local food and culture. There’s the Great Wall of China, numerous palaces and tombs of emperors and empresses past, Tiananmen Square, the Forbidden City and more. For the destinations that were nearby, the commute was swift and effortless. The destinations that were further off, however, were much more of a challenge and needed a little more attention.  Add the 12 hour flights to and from Beijing, and you can really imagine what impact such a vacation could have on well-being! Staying healthy in Beijing was easy, simple and rewarding. The key was to continue practicing my daily healthy habits and modify them to fit the circumstances. Here’s are 3 ways I stayed healthy during my week-long trip through Beijing:   Regular Network Spinal Care before and after the trip Drs. Allison, Anita, and I all benefit from getting regular Network Spinal Care. Kiva Bottero, Natural News (link), calls Network Spinal Analysis (NSA) “an innovative approach to chiropractic that focuses on communicating with the nervous system in order to release the underlying tension that keeps the spine misaligned.”  NSA is a powerful way for us to have a well-functioning nervous system and a body that is resilient, flexible and free to heal itself naturally (read more from our website here). During my week of travels, I still benefited from all the NSA Care that I have received. My body-mind has strategies to stay calm and connected, and to practice healthy travel habits needed by my body.   Yoga during the trip During the trip, I practiced 15-20 minutes of yoga each morning before breakfast. I performed a short routine that includes standing postures and floor poses for strength, endurance and flexibility. Yoga is great for awakening our bodies and for preparing us for our first meal of the day. I find it always helps me clear out my lungs and airways of anything accumulated the day before. It’s also easier for me to be still physically and mentally on long bus trips after moving my joints, breathing deeply and stretching my tissues in yoga. With a bit of practice it can be very easy to do your own yoga practice! Stay tuned for a future article on building a personal yoga practice. In the meantime, our Monday night yoga class (click here for schedule) with Rupel Pandya is a great step to having more yoga in your life.   Make healthier food choices Beijing is brimming with food choices that span the entire spectrum of healthy nutrition. I looked for plant-based whole foods wherever possible – vegetables, fruits, legumes and grains and leaned towards dishes that were lightly seasoned and oiled (or even better unseasoned and un-oiled). That meant I was enjoying dishes such as millet congee, freshly made unsweetened hot soy milk, stir-fried vegetables and tofu, and plain white rice. On some days, I’d eat a meal of simply watermelon, Chinese Hami Gold melons, Chinese fresh dates, and mandarins / clementines. Eating whole foods helped me maintain steady energy levels and regular elimination. It also helped me ensure I was getting all the vitamins, minerals and antioxidants that are so abundant in plant-based foods.   Staying active, eating well and getting regular Network Spinal Care are 3 of the ways I got the most out...

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